The Importance of Follow UP

The Importance of Follow-Up

Following up with clients is crucial, according to Adrienne Zoble, principal of Adrienne Zoble Associates Inc., located in Fort Collins, Colorado. “The key to organized, diligent follow-up is prioritizing,” said Zoble, a business owner who since 1977 has been teaching business owners and executives how to sell more in less time.

Zoble said the frequency and amount of follow up needed depended on the complexity of what was sold to the customer and its life span. Research shows that most prospects don’t buy the first time. They have to encounter a marketing message multiple times before making a purchasing decision. This makes follow-up an essential ingredient in the selling process.

“It doesn’t mean I have to do the same thing with everybody,” Zoble explained. “Some people will get phone calls and some will get emails. I tell people you should check in probably once a quarter or once a month if the product or service is complicated,” said Zoble. “For example, I will check in monthly if I write a marketing plan for a client.”

Follow-Up Situations

Sales follow-up is one of the most common and important types of follow-up situations. This type of follow-up positions you away from the competition so you can generate more business from your existing customers. It shows that your company has its act together and really cares about satisfying customers.

According to Zoble, approximately 55 to 65 percent of salespeople do not conduct sales follow-up. They often say they don’t have the time but they’re really afraid of what they’ll hear. Sales follow-up can result in a positive experience, even if customers were slightly displeased with your product or service.

“If the client is marginally pleased, it shows you’re there after the sale and you’re attentive,” she explained. “But if there’s something marginally wrong and you don’t follow-up, then your customer won’t call you when they go to buy the next time around; they will buy from someone else.”

Sales follow-up also makes good financial sense. Getting business from new customers can consume 100 percent of your marketing costs. It will only cost 15 percent of your marketing budget however, to secure additional business from existing customers.

Another typical follow-up method involves placing call-backs to prospects after submitting a bid or proposal. During follow-up, it’s important to ask open-ended questions and then listen. To create an open-ended question, just put an adverb at the beginning of the sentence — but don’t ask “why” because it’s antagonistic. You could ask: What did you think of the quote? Or how did you feel about what was included? Asking open-ended questions gives you an opportunity to gather more information from the prospect to pinpoint his or her needs accurately.

“You’re not selling what you have, you’re selling what they need,” Zoble said. “Usually, they’re close to being the same; but there’s a different spin on it.”

Unfortunately, too many business people don’t follow up on sales quotes. Some become overwhelmed by having sent out too many quotes or they simply may be afraid to follow-up. To that, Zoble said, “Why take the time to send out the quote if you don’t follow up?”

 

Tips for Following-Up

Follow-up isn’t just about selling. It’s about building relationships and allowing the sale to happen. Here is some additional follow-up advice from Zoble:

Do what you can. When it comes to following up, you don’t have to take an all-or-nothing approach. Doing something is better than nothing, so follow-up as frequently and best as you can.

Don’t ever ask yes-or-no questions. Ask who, what, when or how many. Anything that will get prospects talking. Before you pick up the phone to make that follow-up call, write down three open-ended questions to ask prospects. If you start your call with an open-ended question, you’ll be amazed at how easily the rest of the conversation flows.

Make sure the right person follows up. The person making the follow up call should be the person who has worked with that company. Keep in mind that there are certain calls that are more appropriate coming specifically from inside customer service, an outside salesperson or the boss.

Space out your phone calls. Don’t slot a long, uninterrupted block of time to make calls because your approach can become dull. Instead, place a call here and there to keep things fresh.

Using eNewsletters can greatly enhance your follow-up efforts with prospects and customers. Because of their inherent tracking technology, eNewsletters can tell you which topics and what parts of your web site are most interesting to your readers. It’s an incredible tool you can turn over to your sales staff and say, “when is the last time you made follow-up efforts?”

For more information about capitalizing on the benefit of follow up, email Adrienne Zoble or call 970-282-1150 or 866-282-1150.

To get additional information on eNewsletters, email Proven Systems or call 970-223-6565.

 
 

The Importance of Follow-Up

Following up with clients is crucial, according to Adrienne Zoble, principal of Adrienne Zoble Associates Inc., located in Fort Collins, Colorado. “The key to organized, diligent follow-up is prioritizing,” said Zoble, a business owner who since 1977 has been teaching business owners and executives how to sell more in less time.

Zoble said the frequency and amount of follow up needed depended on the complexity of what was sold to the customer and its life span. Research shows that most prospects don’t buy the first time. They have to encounter a marketing message multiple times before making a purchasing decision. This makes follow-up an essential ingredient in the selling process.

“It doesn’t mean I have to do the same thing with everybody,” Zoble explained. “Some people will get phone calls and some will get emails. I tell people you should check in probably once a quarter or once a month if the product or service is complicated,” said Zoble. “For example, I will check in monthly if I write a marketing plan for a client.”

Follow-Up Situations

Sales follow-up is one of the most common and important types of follow-up situations. This type of follow-up positions you away from the competition so you can generate more business from your existing customers. It shows that your company has its act together and really cares about satisfying customers.

According to Zoble, approximately 55 to 65 percent of salespeople do not conduct sales follow-up. They often say they don’t have the time but they’re really afraid of what they’ll hear. Sales follow-up can result in a positive experience, even if customers were slightly displeased with your product or service.

“If the client is marginally pleased, it shows you’re there after the sale and you’re attentive,” she explained. “But if there’s something marginally wrong and you don’t follow-up, then your customer won’t call you when they go to buy the next time around; they will buy from someone else.”

Sales follow-up also makes good financial sense. Getting business from new customers can consume 100 percent of your marketing costs. It will only cost 15 percent of your marketing budget however, to secure additional business from existing customers.

Another typical follow-up method involves placing call-backs to prospects after submitting a bid or proposal. During follow-up, it’s important to ask open-ended questions and then listen. To create an open-ended question, just put an adverb at the beginning of the sentence — but don’t ask “why” because it’s antagonistic. You could ask: What did you think of the quote? Or how did you feel about what was included? Asking open-ended questions gives you an opportunity to gather more information from the prospect to pinpoint his or her needs accurately.

“You’re not selling what you have, you’re selling what they need,” Zoble said. “Usually, they’re close to being the same; but there’s a different spin on it.”

Unfortunately, too many business people don’t follow up on sales quotes. Some become overwhelmed by having sent out too many quotes or they simply may be afraid to follow-up. To that, Zoble said, “Why take the time to send out the quote if you don’t follow up?”

Tips for Following-Up

Follow-up isn’t just about selling. It’s about building relationships and allowing the sale to happen. Here is some additional follow-up advice from Zoble:

Do what you can. When it comes to following up, you don’t have to take an all-or-nothing approach. Doing something is better than nothing, so follow-up as frequently and best as you can.

Don’t ever ask yes-or-no questions. Ask who, what, when or how many. Anything that will get prospects talking. Before you pick up the phone to make that follow-up call, write down three open-ended questions to ask prospects. If you start your call with an open-ended question, you’ll be amazed at how easily the rest of the conversation flows.

Make sure the right person follows up. The person making the follow up call should be the person who has worked with that company. Keep in mind that there are certain calls that are more appropriate coming specifically from inside customer service, an outside salesperson or the boss.

Space out your phone calls. Don’t slot a long, uninterrupted block of time to make calls because your approach can become dull. Instead, place a call here and there to keep things fresh.

Using eNewsletters can greatly enhance your follow-up efforts with prospects and customers. Because of their inherent tracking technology, eNewsletters can tell you which topics and what parts of your web site are most interesting to your readers. It’s an incredible tool you can turn over to your sales staff and say, “when is the last time you made follow-up efforts?”

For more information about capitalizing on the benefit of follow up, email Adrienne Zoble or call 970-282-1150 or 866-282-1150.

To get additional information on eNewsletters, email Proven Systems or call 970-223-6565.

 
 

The Importance of Follow-Up

Following up with clients is crucial, according to Adrienne Zoble, principal of Adrienne Zoble Associates Inc., located in Fort Collins, Colorado. “The key to organized, diligent follow-up is prioritizing,” said Zoble, a business owner who since 1977 has been teaching business owners and executives how to sell more in less time.

Zoble said the frequency and amount of follow up needed depended on the complexity of what was sold to the customer and its life span. Research shows that most prospects don’t buy the first time. They have to encounter a marketing message multiple times before making a purchasing decision. This makes follow-up an essential ingredient in the selling process.

“It doesn’t mean I have to do the same thing with everybody,” Zoble explained. “Some people will get phone calls and some will get emails. I tell people you should check in probably once a quarter or once a month if the product or service is complicated,” said Zoble. “For example, I will check in monthly if I write a marketing plan for a client.”

Follow-Up Situations

Sales follow-up is one of the most common and important types of follow-up situations. This type of follow-up positions you away from the competition so you can generate more business from your existing customers. It shows that your company has its act together and really cares about satisfying customers.

According to Zoble, approximately 55 to 65 percent of salespeople do not conduct sales follow-up. They often say they don’t have the time but they’re really afraid of what they’ll hear. Sales follow-up can result in a positive experience, even if customers were slightly displeased with your product or service.

“If the client is marginally pleased, it shows you’re there after the sale and you’re attentive,” she explained. “But if there’s something marginally wrong and you don’t follow-up, then your customer won’t call you when they go to buy the next time around; they will buy from someone else.”

Sales follow-up also makes good financial sense. Getting business from new customers can consume 100 percent of your marketing costs. It will only cost 15 percent of your marketing budget however, to secure additional business from existing customers.

Another typical follow-up method involves placing call-backs to prospects after submitting a bid or proposal. During follow-up, it’s important to ask open-ended questions and then listen. To create an open-ended question, just put an adverb at the beginning of the sentence — but don’t ask “why” because it’s antagonistic. You could ask: What did you think of the quote? Or how did you feel about what was included? Asking open-ended questions gives you an opportunity to gather more information from the prospect to pinpoint his or her needs accurately.

“You’re not selling what you have, you’re selling what they need,” Zoble said. “Usually, they’re close to being the same; but there’s a different spin on it.”

Unfortunately, too many business people don’t follow up on sales quotes. Some become overwhelmed by having sent out too many quotes or they simply may be afraid to follow-up. To that, Zoble said, “Why take the time to send out the quote if you don’t follow up?”

Tips for Following-Up

Follow-up isn’t just about selling. It’s about building relationships and allowing the sale to happen. Here is some additional follow-up advice from Zoble:

Do what you can. When it comes to following up, you don’t have to take an all-or-nothing approach. Doing something is better than nothing, so follow-up as frequently and best as you can.

Don’t ever ask yes-or-no questions. Ask who, what, when or how many. Anything that will get prospects talking. Before you pick up the phone to make that follow-up call, write down three open-ended questions to ask prospects. If you start your call with an open-ended question, you’ll be amazed at how easily the rest of the conversation flows.

Make sure the right person follows up. The person making the follow up call should be the person who has worked with that company. Keep in mind that there are certain calls that are more appropriate coming specifically from inside customer service, an outside salesperson or the boss.

Space out your phone calls. Don’t slot a long, uninterrupted block of time to make calls because your approach can become dull. Instead, place a call here and there to keep things fresh.

Using eNewsletters can greatly enhance your follow-up efforts with prospects and customers. Because of their inherent tracking technology, eNewsletters can tell you which topics and what parts of your web site are most interesting to your readers. It’s an incredible tool you can turn over to your sales staff and say, “when is the last time you made follow-up efforts?”

For more information about capitalizing on the benefit of follow up, email Adrienne Zoble or call 970-282-1150 or 866-282-1150.

To get additional information on eNewsletters, email Proven Systems or call 970-223-6565.

 
 

The Importance of Follow-Up

Following up with clients is crucial, according to Adrienne Zoble, principal of Adrienne Zoble Associates Inc., located in Fort Collins, Colorado. “The key to organized, diligent follow-up is prioritizing,” said Zoble, a business owner who since 1977 has been teaching business owners and executives how to sell more in less time.

Zoble said the frequency and amount of follow up needed depended on the complexity of what was sold to the customer and its life span. Research shows that most prospects don’t buy the first time. They have to encounter a marketing message multiple times before making a purchasing decision. This makes follow-up an essential ingredient in the selling process.

“It doesn’t mean I have to do the same thing with everybody,” Zoble explained. “Some people will get phone calls and some will get emails. I tell people you should check in probably once a quarter or once a month if the product or service is complicated,” said Zoble. “For example, I will check in monthly if I write a marketing plan for a client.”

Follow-Up Situations

Sales follow-up is one of the most common and important types of follow-up situations. This type of follow-up positions you away from the competition so you can generate more business from your existing customers. It shows that your company has its act together and really cares about satisfying customers.

According to Zoble, approximately 55 to 65 percent of salespeople do not conduct sales follow-up. They often say they don’t have the time but they’re really afraid of what they’ll hear. Sales follow-up can result in a positive experience, even if customers were slightly displeased with your product or service.

“If the client is marginally pleased, it shows you’re there after the sale and you’re attentive,” she explained. “But if there’s something marginally wrong and you don’t follow-up, then your customer won’t call you when they go to buy the next time around; they will buy from someone else.”

Sales follow-up also makes good financial sense. Getting business from new customers can consume 100 percent of your marketing costs. It will only cost 15 percent of your marketing budget however, to secure additional business from existing customers.

Another typical follow-up method involves placing call-backs to prospects after submitting a bid or proposal. During follow-up, it’s important to ask open-ended questions and then listen. To create an open-ended question, just put an adverb at the beginning of the sentence — but don’t ask “why” because it’s antagonistic. You could ask: What did you think of the quote? Or how did you feel about what was included? Asking open-ended questions gives you an opportunity to gather more information from the prospect to pinpoint his or her needs accurately.

“You’re not selling what you have, you’re selling what they need,” Zoble said. “Usually, they’re close to being the same; but there’s a different spin on it.”

Unfortunately, too many business people don’t follow up on sales quotes. Some become overwhelmed by having sent out too many quotes or they simply may be afraid to follow-up. To that, Zoble said, “Why take the time to send out the quote if you don’t follow up?”

Tips for Following-Up

Follow-up isn’t just about selling. It’s about building relationships and allowing the sale to happen. Here is some additional follow-up advice from Zoble:

Do what you can. When it comes to following up, you don’t have to take an all-or-nothing approach. Doing something is better than nothing, so follow-up as frequently and best as you can.

Don’t ever ask yes-or-no questions. Ask who, what, when or how many. Anything that will get prospects talking. Before you pick up the phone to make that follow-up call, write down three open-ended questions to ask prospects. If you start your call with an open-ended question, you’ll be amazed at how easily the rest of the conversation flows.

Make sure the right person follows up. The person making the follow up call should be the person who has worked with that company. Keep in mind that there are certain calls that are more appropriate coming specifically from inside customer service, an outside salesperson or the boss.

Space out your phone calls. Don’t slot a long, uninterrupted block of time to make calls because your approach can become dull. Instead, place a call here and there to keep things fresh.

Using eNewsletters can greatly enhance your follow-up efforts with prospects and customers. Because of their inherent tracking technology, eNewsletters can tell you which topics and what parts of your web site are most interesting to your readers. It’s an incredible tool you can turn over to your sales staff and say, “when is the last time you made follow-up efforts?”

For more information about capitalizing on the benefit of follow up, email Adrienne Zoble or call 970-282-1150 or 866-282-1150.

To get additional information on eNewsletters, email Proven Systems or call 970-223-6565.

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